Why I Believe in Creation (Faith and Science 4)

For me personally the Bible and philosophical reasoning both point to a Creator and a relatively recent creation. I recognize that people who favor the scientific evidence can read Genesis in ways that differ from the traditional. But the best exegetical work on the Bible points to the idea that the ancients who wrote and read these texts understood them to be pointing to a creator God as the originator of the natural world and that God’s creative activity is fairly rapid and recent. And beyond Genesis, the Bible’s teachings on sin, salvation and resurrection all presuppose a God who actively intervenes in space and time.

Philosophically, I also find it easier to believe that the complexity and beauty of the world we know is the product of a loving and intelligent Designer than that it all is the product of random and chance events over long periods of time. While I am not a scientist, Steven Hawking has been sometimes called the Einstein of the 21st Century. And he has clearly demonstrated that the chances of human life developing on this earth in this universe is something like ten to the five hundredth. That’s one chance in ten followed by 500 zeros. In other words, not much of a chance. That this did not disturb his commitment to atheism makes the admission all the more interesting for me. At the minimum it tells me that scientific certainty on these matters is far from a done deal.

But while the preponderance of scientific evidence is not hostile to the possibility of design, it is very hard to square with the biblical idea of a recent creation of life. Believing, short-age creationist scientists tell me that there is currently no creationist model that is scientifically fruitful in its ability to predict observable outcomes the way microevolution does. We can act as if this is not the case, but it would not be a sound intellectual position. Humility requires honesty. A possible response to this dilemma, however: If God is as great as we believe Him to be, He is capable of doing things in a way that science cannot fully observe or understand. In any case, it seems to me that believers who are honest with the evidence must live with a certain amount of tension. And that is what faith is all about.

3 thoughts on “Why I Believe in Creation (Faith and Science 4)

  1. Zog Has-fallen

    “[T]he preponderance of scientific evidence is … very hard to square with the biblical idea of a recent creation of life. Believing, short-age creationist scientists tell me that there is currently no creationist model that is scientifically fruitful in its ability to predict observable outcomes the way microevolution does.”

    Those creationist scientists are grossly mistaken. Short-age creationism is perfectly consistent with Darwin’s four main postulates. The only scientifically questionable presupposition that competent creationists should be compelled to dispute is the common descent postulate, which is unobservable on our planet and generates no testable predictions.

    Reply
  2. Robert Whiteman

    Only by seeing the Author of Truth as faithful, can one find confidence in what cannot be “proven”. We must realize the infinite capacity of God while falling far short of understanding it. Everything in creation declares His glory and power (Ps 19, Rom 1) and we can only marvel, while realizing the blight of sin upon these ‘great and marvelous” works of the Lord.

    So what is the convincing evidence? Isn’t it the promised Peace given through justification(forgiveness) and the life-changing power that follows faith? Perhaps this is why creation is barely mentioned compared to the Gospel appeal and promise of peace/rest throughout God’s word. We observe life following the command to bring forth after it’s kind. We experience daily(in most places) the table prepared before us in the presence of the enemy of souls, proving God is on His throne and overrules the kingdoms of men and power of devils. We enjoy the sun and rain, whether just or unjust, and the air is still breathable in spite of our efforts to ruin it. Seed time and harvest still follow in order as God feeds the life He has brought forth for His pleasure and joy.

    Some truths are beyond proving, but those things revealed and experienced will be evidence for faith, which is the “evidence of things not seen”. Yet, the promise is that “the pure in heart shall see…”.

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *